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Monday March 23, 2020

My Dear Faithful,

Because of the circumstances of the current chastisement all Masses and activities at Our Lady Help of Christians chapel are suspended as of today.  Please remember that although the situation makes it impossible for you to attend Mass and that you are relieved of this obligation for the present we all still have the obligation to keep holy the Sabbath day. This we do by prayer, spiritual Communion, and spiritual reading, as well as activities proper to the Lord’s Day. I have included a link to a website with many, many good Catholic books that can be read online for free.

     

Furthermore please bear in mind that while we cannot have Masses at the chapel at the present we still have bills to pay. If the situation does not change before Easter, the faithful are asked to please continue to support the parish in this time of crisis by mailing their contributions to the address found at the end of this announcement. As always you are in my prayers and private Masses. Let us all do prayers and penance together to beg God to remove the scourge from us so that we may resume parish life as normal.

God Bless You! Mary Keep You!
Rt. Rev. Msgr. Patrick J. Perez
511 N. Clementine St.
Anaheim, CA 92805
United States of America 🇺🇸
1-714-635-0510 (Primary Contact #. Leave Message!)

Click Here for some Good Catholic books to read.


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Saint Stories for March 24-28

St. Gabriel, Archangel – March 24

St. Gabriel was sent to Daniel to reveal the time of Christ’s coming, and to Zachary, when he was offering incense in the temple, to foretell the birth of Christ’s precursor, St. John the Baptist; finally, he was chosen to be God’s messenger at the Annunciation. “Alone among all the angels,” says St. Bernard, “Gabriel was found worthy to announce to Mary God’s designs for her.” From all eternity God had chosen her to be the Mother upon earth of His Divine Son, and Gabriel approached her with awe, greeting her with the divinely inspired words, which the Church wishes us to have constantly on our lips: “Hail, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among women.” This greeting amazed Mary, and Gabriel explained that he had come to ask her consent for the fulfillment of the great mystery which would make possible the redemption of mankind. “I am Gabriel, who stands in God’s presence, and I have been sent to announce this good tiding to thee.” According to several Doctors of the Church, Mary had resolved to remain ever a virgin: and so the angel explained that she should conceive by the Holy Ghost and bear a Son, whom she should name Jesus, Savior. Then Mary humbly and unhesitatingly obeyed saying, “Behold the handmaid of the Lord; be it done unto me according to thy word.”

Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary – March 25

There is a succession of great feasts towards the end of March, and today we celebrate the greatest event in history, the Incarnation of our Lord. As soon as Mary had answered the Angel Gabriel God took into personal union within Himself the blessed fruit of the Virgin’s womb: “The Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us;” the Word took to himself our humanity, our poverty, our nothingness, to give us in exchange “the power to be made sons of God,” to share in His Divine nature. The Incarnation gives Mary her most glorious title that of Mother of God, which the Eastern Church always inscribes in its Greek form “Theotokos” on her pictures and statues. “The Eternal Father’s and the Virgin’s Son are one and the same,” says St. Anselm; in becoming Mother of God, the Blessed Virgin was raised to “closest possible relation to the Divine trinity,” says St. Thomas; and it is for this reason that she has always been given a unique and pre-eminent veneration. She is the queen of the human race, and all men owe her honor. Today none but heaven and the lowly virgin know that has taken place; in nine months time, on Christmas Day, it will be made manifest to the world. Falling in Lent, March 25 reminds us that “for us men and for our salvation, the Son of God came down from heaven, was incarnate by the power of the Holy Ghost in the womb of the Virgin Mary and became man; suffered under Pontius Pilate, was buried and rose again the third day.” As Mother of God, Mary is all powerful with her Son; let us have recourse to her intercession for grace to attain by the merits of His Passion and Cross to the glory of His Resurrection.

St. John Damascene, Confessor and Doctor – March 27

St. John Damascene, John of Damascus, was the great champion of the

veneration of images (statues and pictures) against the iconoclasts. He was a great theologian, and his works are invaluable because in them he

gathered together and handed down the teaching of the Greek Fathers of the Church. The second Council of Nicea spoke of the “golden stream” of his teaching, and Leo XIII proclaimed him Doctor of the Church. He wrote liturgical hymns which are still used in the Greek Church. The theme of the Mass is praise of Almighty God’s support of those who fight in His service; but several texts, notably the Gospel, are chosen with reference to an episode, perhaps legendary, in St. John’s biography: he is said to have had his hand cut off by his enemies, miraculously restored. He died in 749.

St. John Capistran, Confessor – March 28

John was a native of Capistrano, in the Abruzzi (Italy). He became a Franciscan and was one of the great organizers of the struggle against the Mohammedans in the fifteenth century, when they threatened to overrun the whole of Europe. Mohammed II had taken Constantinople and was already marching against Belgrade, when Pope Callixtus III called St. John Capistran to preach the crusade; assisted by the Hungarian, John Hunyadi, he gathered a strong Christian army, which defeated the Turks in the great battle of Belgrade in 1453. He died in 1456.

During Lent Keep St. Joseph Your Daily Companion Oh St. Joseph, whose protection is so great, so strong, so prompt before the throne of God. I place in you all my interests and desires. Oh, St. Joseph, do assist me by your powerful intercession, and obtain for me from your divine Son all spiritual blessings, through Jesus Christ, our Lord. So that, having engaged here below your heavenly power, I may offer my thanksgiving and homage to the most loving of Fathers.

Oh, St. Joseph, I never weary of contemplating you, and Jesus asleep in your arms; I dare not approach while He reposes near your heart. Press Him in my name and kiss His fine head for me and ask him to return the Kiss when I draw my dying breath. St. Joseph, Patron of departing souls – Pray for me. In the Family of Jesus, Mary, and Joseph – Fr. Stephen, o.f.m.

 

St. Gabriel, Archangel – March 24

St. Gabriel was sent to Daniel to reveal the time of Christ’s coming, and to Zachary, when he was offering incense in the temple, to foretell the birth of Christ’s precursor, St. John the Baptist; finally, he was chosen to be God’s messenger at the Annunciation. “Alone among all the angels,” says St. Bernard, “Gabriel was found worthy to announce to Mary God’s designs for her.” From all eternity God had chosen her to be the Mother upon earth of His Divine Son, and Gabriel approached her with awe, greeting her with the divinely inspired words, which the Church wishes us to have constantly on our lips: “Hail, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among women.” This greeting amazed Mary, and Gabriel explained that he had come to ask her consent for the fulfillment of the great mystery which would make possible the redemption of mankind. “I am Gabriel, who stands in God’s presence, and I have been sent to announce this good tiding to thee.” According to several Doctors of the Church, Mary had resolved to remain ever a virgin: and so the angel explained that she should conceive by the Holy Ghost and bear a Son, whom she should name Jesus, Savior. Then Mary humbly and unhesitatingly obeyed saying, “Behold the handmaid of the Lord; be it done unto me according to thy word.”

Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary – March 25

There is a succession of great feasts towards the end of March, and today we celebrate the greatest event in history, the Incarnation of our Lord. As soon as Mary had answered the Angel Gabriel God took into personal union within Himself the blessed fruit of the Virgin’s womb: “The Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us;” the Word took to himself our humanity, our poverty, our nothingness, to give us in exchange “the power to be made sons of God,” to share in His Divine nature. The Incarnation gives Mary her most glorious title that of Mother of God, which the Eastern Church always inscribes in its Greek form “Theotokos” on her pictures and statues. “The Eternal Father’s and the Virgin’s Son are one and the same,” says St. Anselm; in becoming Mother of God, the Blessed Virgin was raised to “closest possible relation to the Divine trinity,” says St. Thomas; and it is for this reason that she has always been given a unique and pre-eminent veneration. She is the queen of the human race, and all men owe her honor. Today none but heaven and the lowly virgin know that has taken place; in nine months time, on Christmas Day, it will be made manifest to the world. Falling in Lent, March 25 reminds us that “for us men and for our salvation, the Son of God came down from heaven, was incarnate by the power of the Holy Ghost in the womb of the Virgin Mary and became man; suffered under Pontius Pilate, was buried and rose again the third day.” As Mother of God, Mary is all powerful with her Son; let us have recourse to her intercession for grace to attain by the merits of His Passion and Cross to the glory of His Resurrection.

St. John Damascene, Confessor and Doctor – March 27

St. John Damascene, John of Damascus, was the great champion of the

veneration of images (statues and pictures) against the iconoclasts. He was a great theologian, and his works are invaluable because in them he

gathered together and handed down the teaching of the Greek Fathers of the Church. The second Council of Nicea spoke of the “golden stream” of his teaching, and Leo XIII proclaimed him Doctor of the Church. He wrote liturgical hymns which are still used in the Greek Church. The theme of the Mass is praise of Almighty God’s support of those who fight in His service; but several texts, notably the Gospel, are chosen with reference to an episode, perhaps legendary, in St. John’s biography: he is said to have had his hand cut off by his enemies, miraculously restored. He died in 749.

St. John Capistran, Confessor – March 28

John was a native of Capistrano, in the Abruzzi (Italy). He became a Franciscan and was one of the great organizers of the struggle against the Mohammedans in the fifteenth century, when they threatened to overrun the whole of Europe. Mohammed II had taken Constantinople and was already marching against Belgrade, when Pope Callixtus III called St. John Capistran to preach the crusade; assisted by the Hungarian, John Hunyadi, he gathered a strong Christian army, which defeated the Turks in the great battle of Belgrade in 1453. He died in 1456.

During Lent Keep St. Joseph Your Daily Companion Oh St. Joseph, whose protection is so great, so strong, so prompt before the throne of God. I place in you all my interests and desires. Oh, St. Joseph, do assist me by your powerful intercession, and obtain for me from your divine Son all spiritual blessings, through Jesus Christ, our Lord. So that, having engaged here below your heavenly power, I may offer my thanksgiving and homage to the most loving of Fathers.

Oh, St. Joseph, I never weary of contemplating you, and Jesus asleep in your arms; I dare not approach while He reposes near your heart. Press Him in my name and kiss His fine head for me and ask him to return the Kiss when I draw my dying breath. St. Joseph, Patron of departing souls – Pray for me. In the Family of Jesus, Mary, and Joseph – Fr. Stephen, o.f.m.

 

St. Gabriel, Archangel – March 24

St. Gabriel was sent to Daniel to reveal the time of Christ’s coming, and to Zachary, when he was offering incense in the temple, to foretell the birth of Christ’s precursor, St. John the Baptist; finally, he was chosen to be God’s messenger at the Annunciation. “Alone among all the angels,” says St. Bernard, “Gabriel was found worthy to announce to Mary God’s designs for her.” From all eternity God had chosen her to be the Mother upon earth of His Divine Son, and Gabriel approached her with awe, greeting her with the divinely inspired words, which the Church wishes us to have constantly on our lips: “Hail, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among women.” This greeting amazed Mary, and Gabriel explained that he had come to ask her consent for the fulfillment of the great mystery which would make possible the redemption of mankind. “I am Gabriel, who stands in God’s presence, and I have been sent to announce this good tiding to thee.” According to several Doctors of the Church, Mary had resolved to remain ever a virgin: and so the angel explained that she should conceive by the Holy Ghost and bear a Son, whom she should name Jesus, Savior. Then Mary humbly and unhesitatingly obeyed saying, “Behold the handmaid of the Lord; be it done unto me according to thy word.”

Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary – March 25

There is a succession of great feasts towards the end of March, and today we celebrate the greatest event in history, the Incarnation of our Lord. As soon as Mary had answered the Angel Gabriel God took into personal union within Himself the blessed fruit of the Virgin’s womb: “The Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us;” the Word took to himself our humanity, our poverty, our nothingness, to give us in exchange “the power to be made sons of God,” to share in His Divine nature. The Incarnation gives Mary her most glorious title that of Mother of God, which the Eastern Church always inscribes in its Greek form “Theotokos” on her pictures and statues. “The Eternal Father’s and the Virgin’s Son are one and the same,” says St. Anselm; in becoming Mother of God, the Blessed Virgin was raised to “closest possible relation to the Divine trinity,” says St. Thomas; and it is for this reason that she has always been given a unique and pre-eminent veneration. She is the queen of the human race, and all men owe her honor. Today none but heaven and the lowly virgin know that has taken place; in nine months time, on Christmas Day, it will be made manifest to the world. Falling in Lent, March 25 reminds us that “for us men and for our salvation, the Son of God came down from heaven, was incarnate by the power of the Holy Ghost in the womb of the Virgin Mary and became man; suffered under Pontius Pilate, was buried and rose again the third day.” As Mother of God, Mary is all powerful with her Son; let us have recourse to her intercession for grace to attain by the merits of His Passion and Cross to the glory of His Resurrection.

St. John Damascene, Confessor and Doctor – March 27

St. John Damascene, John of Damascus, was the great champion of the

veneration of images (statues and pictures) against the iconoclasts. He was a great theologian, and his works are invaluable because in them he

gathered together and handed down the teaching of the Greek Fathers of the Church. The second Council of Nicea spoke of the “golden stream” of his teaching, and Leo XIII proclaimed him Doctor of the Church. He wrote liturgical hymns which are still used in the Greek Church. The theme of the Mass is praise of Almighty God’s support of those who fight in His service; but several texts, notably the Gospel, are chosen with reference to an episode, perhaps legendary, in St. John’s biography: he is said to have had his hand cut off by his enemies, miraculously restored. He died in 749.

St. John Capistran, Confessor – March 28

John was a native of Capistrano, in the Abruzzi (Italy). He became a Franciscan and was one of the great organizers of the struggle against the Mohammedans in the fifteenth century, when they threatened to overrun the whole of Europe. Mohammed II had taken Constantinople and was already marching against Belgrade, when Pope Callixtus III called St. John Capistran to preach the crusade; assisted by the Hungarian, John Hunyadi, he gathered a strong Christian army, which defeated the Turks in the great battle of Belgrade in 1453. He died in 1456.

During Lent Keep St. Joseph Your Daily Companion Oh St. Joseph, whose protection is so great, so strong, so prompt before the throne of God. I place in you all my interests and desires. Oh, St. Joseph, do assist me by your powerful intercession, and obtain for me from your divine Son all spiritual blessings, through Jesus Christ, our Lord. So that, having engaged here below your heavenly power, I may offer my thanksgiving and homage to the most loving of Fathers.

Oh, St. Joseph, I never weary of contemplating you, and Jesus asleep in your arms; I dare not approach while He reposes near your heart. Press Him in my name and kiss His fine head for me and ask him to return the Kiss when I draw my dying breath. St. Joseph, Patron of departing souls – Pray for me. In the Family of Jesus, Mary, and Joseph – Fr. Stephen, o.f.m.

 

St. Gabriel, Archangel – March 24

St. Gabriel was sent to Daniel to reveal the time of Christ’s coming, and to Zachary, when he was offering incense in the temple, to foretell the birth of Christ’s precursor, St. John the Baptist; finally, he was chosen to be God’s messenger at the Annunciation. “Alone among all the angels,” says St. Bernard, “Gabriel was found worthy to announce to Mary God’s designs for her.” From all eternity God had chosen her to be the Mother upon earth of His Divine Son, and Gabriel approached her with awe, greeting her with the divinely inspired words, which the Church wishes us to have constantly on our lips: “Hail, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among women.” This greeting amazed Mary, and Gabriel explained that he had come to ask her consent for the fulfillment of the great mystery which would make possible the redemption of mankind. “I am Gabriel, who stands in God’s presence, and I have been sent to announce this good tiding to thee.” According to several Doctors of the Church, Mary had resolved to remain ever a virgin: and so the angel explained that she should conceive by the Holy Ghost and bear a Son, whom she should name Jesus, Savior. Then Mary humbly and unhesitatingly obeyed saying, “Behold the handmaid of the Lord; be it done unto me according to thy word.”

Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary – March 25

There is a succession of great feasts towards the end of March, and today we celebrate the greatest event in history, the Incarnation of our Lord. As soon as Mary had answered the Angel Gabriel God took into personal union within Himself the blessed fruit of the Virgin’s womb: “The Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us;” the Word took to himself our humanity, our poverty, our nothingness, to give us in exchange “the power to be made sons of God,” to share in His Divine nature. The Incarnation gives Mary her most glorious title that of Mother of God, which the Eastern Church always inscribes in its Greek form “Theotokos” on her pictures and statues. “The Eternal Father’s and the Virgin’s Son are one and the same,” says St. Anselm; in becoming Mother of God, the Blessed Virgin was raised to “closest possible relation to the Divine trinity,” says St. Thomas; and it is for this reason that she has always been given a unique and pre-eminent veneration. She is the queen of the human race, and all men owe her honor. Today none but heaven and the lowly virgin know that has taken place; in nine months time, on Christmas Day, it will be made manifest to the world. Falling in Lent, March 25 reminds us that “for us men and for our salvation, the Son of God came down from heaven, was incarnate by the power of the Holy Ghost in the womb of the Virgin Mary and became man; suffered under Pontius Pilate, was buried and rose again the third day.” As Mother of God, Mary is all powerful with her Son; let us have recourse to her intercession for grace to attain by the merits of His Passion and Cross to the glory of His Resurrection.

St. John Damascene, Confessor and Doctor – March 27

St. John Damascene, John of Damascus, was the great champion of the

veneration of images (statues and pictures) against the iconoclasts. He was a great theologian, and his works are invaluable because in them he

gathered together and handed down the teaching of the Greek Fathers of the Church. The second Council of Nicea spoke of the “golden stream” of his teaching, and Leo XIII proclaimed him Doctor of the Church. He wrote liturgical hymns which are still used in the Greek Church. The theme of the Mass is praise of Almighty God’s support of those who fight in His service; but several texts, notably the Gospel, are chosen with reference to an episode, perhaps legendary, in St. John’s biography: he is said to have had his hand cut off by his enemies, miraculously restored. He died in 749.

St. John Capistran, Confessor – March 28

John was a native of Capistrano, in the Abruzzi (Italy). He became a Franciscan and was one of the great organizers of the struggle against the Mohammedans in the fifteenth century, when they threatened to overrun the whole of Europe. Mohammed II had taken Constantinople and was already marching against Belgrade, when Pope Callixtus III called St. John Capistran to preach the crusade; assisted by the Hungarian, John Hunyadi, he gathered a strong Christian army, which defeated the Turks in the great battle of Belgrade in 1453. He died in 1456.

Posted on March 21, 2020 at 6:22 pm

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